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Fats and oils are essential material in food products and therefore their chemical and physical properties play an important role for good quality of food. Natural fats and oils consists of different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), Diacylglycerol (DAGs) and Monoacylglycerol (MAGs). Hence, depending on their carbon number, sn-position on glycerol molecule and degree of saturation, the chemical, thermal and physical properties vary. Also, these fats and oils have tendency to crystallize in typically three different polymorphs (α, β', β). Therefore, the quality of frozen food (which has fats and oils in it) depends on lipid structure along with their polymorph occurrence. For instance, in chocolates, Cocoa Butter (CB) works as a fat phase and upon crystallizing it forms six different polymorphs, thus the quality, storage life, mouthfeel of chocolates depends on the crystallizing process. The combination with another fat/oil alters the thermal, physical properties along with the morphological habit of the crystals.

Crystallization of fats and oils blends

Fats and oils are essential material in food products and therefore their chemical and physical properties play an important role for good quality of food. Natural fats and oils consists of different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), Diacylglycerol (DAGs) and Monoacylglycerol (MAGs). Hence, depending on their carbon number, sn-position on glycerol molecule and degree of saturation, the chemical, thermal and physical properties vary. Also, these fats and oils have tendency to crystallize in typically three different polymorphs (α, β', β). Therefore, the quality of frozen food (which has fats and oils in it) depends on lipid structure along with their polymorph occurrence. For instance, in chocolates, Cocoa Butter (CB) works as a fat phase and upon crystallizing it forms six different polymorphs, thus the quality, storage life, mouthfeel of chocolates depends on the crystallizing process. The combination with another fat/oil alters the thermal, physical properties along with the morphological habit of the crystals. [more]
<p>Food consists of a variety of components like lipids, polyelectrolytes, polysaccharides, salts, minerals etc. The interactions among these components determine several aspects of food like their taste, texture, stability, aroma characteristics and mouth feel. Polysaccharide-surfactant interactions are one among the most important interactions that influence the quality of food. Charged surfactants interact with charged polysaccharides like Xanthan, Carrageenan, Alginic acid etc. through electrostatic interactions leading to the formation of surfactant micelle polysaccharide complex coacervates phases. These complexes may be soluble or insoluble depending on factors like mixing ratio of surfactant, pH, ionic strength, temperature etc. By understanding the basic mechanisms underlying the complex coacervatation mechanism, we can control the properties of these complexes thus, improving the quality of food.</p>

Surfactant polysaccharide complexes in food systems

Food consists of a variety of components like lipids, polyelectrolytes, polysaccharides, salts, minerals etc. The interactions among these components determine several aspects of food like their taste, texture, stability, aroma characteristics and mouth feel. Polysaccharide-surfactant interactions are one among the most important interactions that influence the quality of food. Charged surfactants interact with charged polysaccharides like Xanthan, Carrageenan, Alginic acid etc. through electrostatic interactions leading to the formation of surfactant micelle polysaccharide complex coacervates phases. These complexes may be soluble or insoluble depending on factors like mixing ratio of surfactant, pH, ionic strength, temperature etc. By understanding the basic mechanisms underlying the complex coacervatation mechanism, we can control the properties of these complexes thus, improving the quality of food.

[more]
Wheat dough, which is the basis for numerous foods including bread and pasta, is a complex system possessing unique mechanical properties. These result from the special composition of some of the wheat proteins (gliadins and glutenins), which form an elastic network (gluten) upon hydration and kneading. Understanding the underlying mechanisms in the system is a prerequisite for any targeted changes, such as the development of a gluten free product with similar textural properties.

Starch/ protein systems

Wheat dough, which is the basis for numerous foods including bread and pasta, is a complex system possessing unique mechanical properties. These result from the special composition of some of the wheat proteins (gliadins and glutenins), which form an elastic network (gluten) upon hydration and kneading. Understanding the underlying mechanisms in the system is a prerequisite for any targeted changes, such as the development of a gluten free product with similar textural properties. [more]
Hydrocolloids are widely used to improve quality and texture of food products. They are established as thickening additives, gelling agents or to stabilize dispersions and solutions. High sugar concentrations (to enhance sweetness or change texture) often influence their interactions and resulting effects.

Inulin gels

Hydrocolloids are widely used to improve quality and texture of food products. They are established as thickening additives, gelling agents or to stabilize dispersions and solutions. High sugar concentrations (to enhance sweetness or change texture) often influence their interactions and resulting effects. [more]
Oil bodies, also referred to as oleosomes, are spherical structures with a lipid core (triacylglycerides) that is surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and an outer layer of integral proteins, mainly oleosins. By extracting them from plant seeds, a naturally pre-emulsified oil-in-water emulsion is obtained (Fig. 1). Understanding the link between macro- and microscopic properties of the oleosome emulsion and the respective structure at the molecular level is a prerequisite to develop a rational structure-based design for oleosome products. <span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: xx-small;"><br /> </span>

Oil bodies from plant seeds

Oil bodies, also referred to as oleosomes, are spherical structures with a lipid core (triacylglycerides) that is surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and an outer layer of integral proteins, mainly oleosins. By extracting them from plant seeds, a naturally pre-emulsified oil-in-water emulsion is obtained (Fig. 1). Understanding the link between macro- and microscopic properties of the oleosome emulsion and the respective structure at the molecular level is a prerequisite to develop a rational structure-based design for oleosome products.
[more]
Hydrocolloids are widely used to improve quality and texture of food products. They are established as thickening additives, gelling agents or to stabilize dispersions and solutions. High sugar concentrations (to enhance sweetness or change texture) often influence their interactions and resulting effects.

Texturizers and Hydrogels

Hydrocolloids are widely used to improve quality and texture of food products. They are established as thickening additives, gelling agents or to stabilize dispersions and solutions. High sugar concentrations (to enhance sweetness or change texture) often influence their interactions and resulting effects. [more]
<p>Starch is one of the most widely used stabilizing, thickening and gelling agent in the food industry. Since early human history, starchy foods derived from seeds, roots or tubers have been consumed as part of the daily diet. Tapioca starch is obtained from the roots of the cassava plant or also known as yucca or manioc. Due to its low amylose content, the tapioca starch pastes reach only a low viscosity which gives an ideal starting point for modifications. The combination with hydrocolloids alters the viscoelastic behavior and texture of the pastes.</p>

Modified starches

Starch is one of the most widely used stabilizing, thickening and gelling agent in the food industry. Since early human history, starchy foods derived from seeds, roots or tubers have been consumed as part of the daily diet. Tapioca starch is obtained from the roots of the cassava plant or also known as yucca or manioc. Due to its low amylose content, the tapioca starch pastes reach only a low viscosity which gives an ideal starting point for modifications. The combination with hydrocolloids alters the viscoelastic behavior and texture of the pastes.

[more]
 
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