Publications

1.
Maurer, S.; Ghebremedhin, M.; Zielbauer, B. I.; Knorr, D.; Vilgis, T. A.: Microencapsulation of soybean oil by spray drying using oleosomes. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics 49 (5), 054001 (2016)
2.
Maurer, S.: Spray drying of soybean oleosomes. Dissertation, Technische Universität, Berlin (2014)
3.
Waschatko, G.: Oleosome: natürliche Emulgatoren und deren Verhalten an lebensmittelrelevanten Grenzflächen. Dissertation, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (2013)
4.
Maurer, S.; Waschatko, G.; Schach, D.; Zielbauer, B. I.; Dahl, J.; Weidner, T.; Bonn, M.; Vilgis, T. A.: The Role of Intact Oleosin for Stabilization and Function of Oleosomes. Journal of Physical Chemistry B 117 (44), pp. 13872 - 13883 (2013)
5.
Waschatko, G.; Junghans, A.; Vilgis, T. A.: Soy milk oleosome behaviour at the air-water interface. Faraday Discussions 158, pp. 157 - 169 (2012)
6.
Waschatko, G.; Schiedt, B.; Vilgis, T. A.; Junghans, A.: Soybean Oleosomes Behavior at the Air-Water Interface. Journal of Physical Chemistry B 116 (35), pp. 10832 - 10841 (2012)

Oil bodies from plant seeds

Oil bodies from plant seeds

Oil bodies, also referred to as oleosomes, are spherical structures with a lipid core (triacylglycerides) that is surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and an outer layer of integral proteins, mainly oleosins. By extracting them from plant seeds, a naturally pre-emulsified oil-in-water emulsion is obtained (Fig. 1). Understanding the link between macro- and microscopic properties of the oleosome emulsion and the respective structure at the molecular level is a prerequisite to develop a rational structure-based design for oleosome products.
Fig. 1: Oleosome emulsion (here extracted from soybeans) and a schematic depiction of an oleosome. Zoom Image

Fig. 1: Oleosome emulsion (here extracted from soybeans) and a schematic depiction of an oleosome.

Studying the interfacial behaviour of oleosomes at interfaces helps to understand the interfacial behaviour and stability of their different constituents, particular with regard to their potential application as emulsifiers or carriers of bioactive material in various food formulas.

Fig. 2: Oleosomes immersed in the subphase diffuse to the air-water interface (1+2), oleosome rupture (3) and a 2D-surface film of spread TAG, phospholipids and oleosins is formed (4). Different scenarios of conformation, orientation and arrangement of oleosins within the film are possible (5a-d). Zoom Image

Fig. 2: Oleosomes immersed in the subphase diffuse to the air-water interface (1+2), oleosome rupture (3) and a 2D-surface film of spread TAG, phospholipids and oleosins is formed (4). Different scenarios of conformation, orientation and arrangement of oleosins within the film are possible (5a-d).

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Oleosins play an important role for the stability and function of oleosomes. Changes in the oleosin structure, as caused by, e.g., enzymatic digestion, can have a drastic impact on the physical character of oleosomes. Understanding the correlation between oleosin structure and oleosome function is also of high interest for the food oil refinery, as well as for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

Fig. 3: Changes in the oleosin structure by enzymatic digestion have a significant impact on the stability of oleosomes against aggregation and on their interfacial behaviour. Zoom Image

Fig. 3: Changes in the oleosin structure by enzymatic digestion have a significant impact on the stability of oleosomes against aggregation and on their interfacial behaviour.

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