Highlights 2015

The basic classes of molecules in foods. Proteins, carbohydrates, fat and water, along with ions, define most of the structure and texture properties.
Thomas A. Vilgis
Soft matter food physics - the physics of food and cooking
This review discusses the (soft matter) physics of food. Although food is generally not considered as a typical model system for fundamental (soft matter) physics, a number of basic principles can be found in the interplay between the basic components of foods, water, oil/fat, proteins and carbohydrates.
© IOP (2015)
The basic classes of molecules in foods. Proteins, carbohydrates, fat and water, along with ions, define most of the structure and texture properties.
The nature of the photoconductivity in solution-processed films of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite is investigated by determining the variation of the photoconductive response with temperature.
Melike Karakus, Søren A. Jensen, Francesco D’Angelo, Dmitry Turchinovich, Mischa Bonn, and Enrique Cánovas
Phonon-Electron Scattering Limits Free Charge Mobility in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskites
Owing to their solution processability, tunable bandgap, high emission yields and strong optical absorption, perovskites have emerged as novel low-cost materials for optoelectronic applications. However, many fundamental key aspects remain unsolved, e.g. regarding the nature of charge transport of methylammonium lead halide films. In this work, we demonstrate that charge mobility is limited by interactions with acoustic phonons, which constitutes an inherent limitation of the material.
© ACS - JPCL (2015)
The nature of the photoconductivity in solution-processed films of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite is investigated by determining the variation of the photoconductive response with temperature.
Triple-responsive Polymers combine temperature, pH, and redox stimuli in water and on the surface.
Arda Alkan, Christian Steinmetz, Katharina Landfester, and Frederik R. Wurm
Triple-Stimuli-Responsive Ferrocene-Containing PEGs in Water and on the Surface
The first triple-stimuli-responsive materials with pH-, temperature-, and redox-sensitivity are prepared. Ferrocene-containing PEGs exhibit triple-responsive behavior in solution and on surfaces: their redox response can be switched by temperature and pH making this material useful for catalysis and electrochemical applications. In addition, these polymers are used for surface modification to generate triple responsive glass surfaces.
© ACS
Triple-responsive Polymers combine temperature, pH, and redox stimuli in water and on the surface.
One-pot synthesis of layered electron acceptors with1,2,5-thiadiazole endcaps.
Debin Xia, Xin Guo, Long Chen, Martin Baumgarten, Ashok Keerthi, and Klaus Müllen
Layered Electron Acceptors by Dimerization of Acenes End- Capped with 1,2,5-Thiadiazoles
Varying modes of solid-state packing for organic π-conjugated molecules have played a pivotal role in the field of organic electronics. Spatially extended heteroacenes, especially electron-acceptor molecules were hardly considered. Herein, four layered electron acceptors equipped with terminal 1,2,5-thiadiazole groups have been constructed using a one-pot protocol of acene dimerization. Photophysical and electrochemical properties of these molecules present a marked dependence on conjugation length and molecular geometry. An aggregation-induced emission peak and an intramolecular excimer emission band were observed. This work paves the way for the efficient synthesis of layered heteroacenes.
© Wiley
One-pot synthesis of layered electron acceptors with1,2,5-thiadiazole endcaps.
Researchers found certain heterochiral molecules self-assemble into helices, which can interlock by a cogwheel-like mechanism.
Cécile Roche, Hao-Jan Sun, Pawaret Leowanawat, Fumito Araoka, Benjamin E. Partridge, Mihai Peterca, Daniela A. Wilson, Margaret E. Prendergast, Paul A. Heiney, Robert Graf, Hans W. Spiess, Xiangbing Zeng, Goran Ungar, and Virgil Percec
A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality
Biological macromolecules like DNA are chiral and are exclusively made of building blocks with the same handedness. Because of their ubiquity, it has been long supposed that this “homochirality” is a prerequisite for supramolecular crystals. Now researchers of the University of Pennsylvania, the Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, and the University of Sheffield challenge this assumption. They discovered a class of molecules that can produce a double helix more consistent and more highly ordered than that of DNA, despite being made of a random mix of left- and right-handed building blocks. This discovery opens the door for highly ordered materials, suitable for organic electronics, made from a mix of chiral building blocks, which are easier to synthesize and relatively inexpensive, compared with enantiomerically pure compounds.
© University of Pennsylvania
Researchers found certain heterochiral molecules self-assemble into helices, which can interlock by a cogwheel-like mechanism.
New adhesive powder that transforms itself into glue for hard-to-reach places.
S. Fujii, S. Sawada, S. Nakayama, M. Kappl, K. Ueno, K. Shitajima, H.-J. Butt and Y. Nakamura
Pressure-sensitive adhesive powder
A joint research group, consisting of Osaka Institute of Technology and the MPI-P, has developed a new adhesive that starts out as powder but transforms itself into glue for hard-to-reach places when pressed. This represents a promising application for liquid marble technology.
© MPI-P (2015)
New adhesive powder that transforms itself into glue for hard-to-reach places.
 
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