Highlight Publications 2017

Enhancing CO2 Capture using Robust Superomniphobic Membranes
Florian Geyer, Clarissa Schönecker, Hans-Jürgen Butt, Doris Vollmer
Enhancing CO2 Capture using Robust Superomniphobic Membranes
Superomniphobic membranes for post-combustion CO2 capture are introduced. Concentrated aqueous amine solutions stay on the topmost part of the membranes, providing a large liquid/CO2 interface. Wetting of the membrane, which reduces the capture efficiency, is prevented. The CO2 capture rates using the chemically, mechanically, and thermally stable superomniphobic membranes are enhanced by up to 40% relative to commercial membranes.
© WILEY-VCH (2017)
Photograph of 15 µL water, MDEA (20 and 50 wt%) and hexadecane drops on superomniphobic membrane (top) and schematic of the exchange chamber with a superomniphobic membrane (bottom).
Enhanced Crystal Growth in Binary Lennard-Jones Mixtures
M. Radu and K. Kremer
Enhanced Crystal Growth in Binary Lennard-Jones Mixtures
We study the crystal growth in binary Lennard-Jones mixtures by molecular dynamics simulations. Growth dynamics, the structure of the liquid-solid interfaces as well as droplet incorporation into the crystal vary with solution properties. For demixed systems we observe a strongly enhanced crystal growth at the cost of enclosed impurities. Furthermore, we find different interface morphologies depending on solubility. We relate our observations to growth mechanisms based on the Gibbs-Thomson effect as well as to predictions of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang theory in 2+1 dimensions.
© American Physical Society (2017)
Simulations of enhanced crystal growth in binary Lennard-Jones mixtures: two particle species in a liquid state are shown in black and light grey, while crystalline particles of are dark green for FCC- and orange for HCP-like structures.
Coating nanoparticles with tunable surfactants facilitates control over the protein corona
J. Müller, K. N. Bauer, D. Prozeller, J. Simon, V. Mailänder, F. R. Wurm, S. Winzen, K. Landfester
Coating nanoparticles with tunable surfactants facilitates control over the protein corona
Nanoparticles with long blood circulation time are a prerequisite for targeted drug delivery. To make the nanoparticles invisible for phagocytizing cells, functional moieties on the particle surface are believed to be necessary to attract specific so-called ‘stealth’ proteins forming a protein ‘corona’. Currently, covalent attachment of those moieties represents the only way to achieve that attraction. However, that approach requires a high synthetic effort and is difficult to control. Therefore, we present the coating of model nanoparticles with biodegradable polymeric surfactants as an alternative method. The thermodynamic parameters of the coating process can be tuned by adjusting the surfactants' block lengths and hydrophilicity. Consequently, the unspecific protein adsorption and aggregation tendency of the particles can be controlled, and stealth proteins inhibiting cell uptake are enriched on their surface. This non-covalent approach could be applied to any particle type and thus facilitates tuning the protein corona and its biological impact.
© Elsevier (2017)
Specifically tailored polyphosphoester based surfactants cover the surface of nanomaterials and thus change the thermodynamic properties of following protein adsorption processes
An amphiphilic ruthenium polymetallodrug for combined photodynamic therapy and photochemotherapy in vivo
Wen Sun, Shuyi Li, Bernhard Häupler, Juan Liu, Shubin Jin, Werner Steffen, Ulrich S. Schubert, Hans-Jürgen Butt, Xing-Jie Liang, Si Wu
An amphiphilic ruthenium polymetallodrug for combined photodynamic therapy and photochemotherapy in vivo
An amphiphilic Ru-containing block copolymer self-assembles into nanoparticles. These nanoparticles accumulate at the tumor sit. Red light irradiation of the block copolymer nanoparticles releases anticancer Ru complexes and generates cytotoxic 1O2, both of which can inhibit tumor growth.
© Wiley (2017)
An amphiphilic Ru-containing polymetallodrug was used for anticancer phototherapy
IL-2 functionalized nanocapsules for T cell-based immunotherapy
S.U. Frick, M.P. Domogalla, G. Baier, F.R. Wurm, V. Mailänder, K. Landfester, K. Steinbrink
IL-2 functionalized nanocapsules for T cell-based immunotherapy
Targeting of T cells for biomedical applications still remains an obstacle as they disclose reduced endocytic activities. Here, by coupling the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) to the surface of hydroxyethyl starch nanocapsules, scientists of the MPI-P and the University Medical Center Mainz demonstrated a direct and specific T cell targeting in vitro and in vivo by IL-2 receptor mediated internalization.
© MPI-P (2017)
By coupling the cytokine interleukin-2 to the surface of hydroxyethylstarch nanocapsules, a direct and specific T cell targeting in vitro and in vivo by receptor mediated internalization can be achieved.
 
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