Portrait

Dr. David Ng
Dr. David Ng
Group Leader
Phone:+49 6131 379-136

Coming soon publications

Our paper entitled “Orthogonally Stimulated Assembly/Disassembly of Depsi-peptides by Rational Chemical Design” has been accepted in ChemBioChem. Congratulations to Michaela, Adriana, Jasmina, Tanja and David.

Recently Published

T. Lückerath, T. Strauch, K. Koynov, C. Barner-Kowollik, D. Y. W. Ng, T. Weil "DNA-Polymer Conjugates by Photo-induced RAFT Polymerization" Biomacromolecules  20, 1, 212-221 (2019)

The article is a collaboration with researchers at the School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and Macromolecular Architectures, Institut für Technische Chemie und Polymerchemie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

The members our group gratefully acknowledge financial support by the European Union for a Synergy Grant (319130-BioQ) and the SFB Transregio (TRR) 234.

Publication Highlights

©2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article.
The European Research Council (ERC) under the program Synergy Grant 319130-BioQ granted financial support.

Y. Tokura, S. Harvey, C. Chen, Y. Wu, D.Y.W. Ng, T. Weil. „Fabrication of defined polydopamine nanostructures by DNA origami-templated polymerization” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 57, 1587-1591 (2018)

©2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article.

The European Research Council (ERC) under the program Synergy Grant 319130-BioQ granted financial support. [more]
©2018 The Authors. This is an open access article and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
The article is a collaboration with researchers at the Institute of Organic Chemistry III, Ulm University, Germany; Institute of Molecular Biology, Mainz, Germany and Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center, Ulm, Germany.
The members our group are grateful to the financial support of the ERC Synergy grant 319130-BioQ and the Horizon2020 project Hyperdiamond.

D. Y.W. Ng, R. Vill, Y. Wu, K. Koynov, Y. Tokura, W. Liu, S. Sihler, A. Kreyes, S. Ritz, H. Barth, U. Ziener, T. Weil “Directing intracellular supramolecular assembly with N-heteroaromatic quaterthiophene analogues” Nature Communications 8, 1850 (2017)

©2018 The Authors. This is an open access article and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

The article is a collaboration with researchers at the Institute of Organic Chemistry III, Ulm University, Germany; Institute of Molecular Biology, Mainz, Germany and Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center, Ulm, Germany.

The members our group are grateful to the financial support of the ERC Synergy grant 319130-BioQ and the Horizon2020 project Hyperdiamond.

[more]

Group Leader

Dr. David Ng

David pursued his chemistry studies at the National University of Singapore and received his B.Sc. degree with first class honours in 2009. In 2010, he accepted a scholarship offered by the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPIP) and moved to Ulm under the supervision of Prof. Tanja Weil. David graduated with summa cum laude in 2014 and worked as a junior group leader in the Institute of Organic Chemistry III at Ulm University. He subsequently moved to the MPIP and leads the life-like nanosystems group focusing on precision (bio)macromolecules and stimulus responsive chemistry. In 2019, he is featured as one of the emerging “key figures that will shape the future of research at the interface of chemistry and biology” in the ChemBioTalents issue (Wiley VCH).

Ringberg Castle (Tegernsee) 2017 Zoom Image
Ringberg Castle (Tegernsee) 2017

Research Topics:

Chemistry of Self-Assembly in Living Systems

Self-organization in Nature is a fascinating phenomenon where molecules form transient supramolecular or dynamic bonds on demand. In this area, we focus extensively on designing molecules that self-assembles within a living environment i.e. in a cell. This involves the understanding of the biological environment and the necessary triggers in order to control, both time and location, of the assembly process. By creating synthetic architectures within the living cell, we hope to derive nanostructures that would provide complementary functions in biology.

Interface Engineering of (Bio)macromolecule-Polymer Nanostructures

The core focus of this topic uses the architectural perfection of biomacromolecules such as proteins and DNA to provide a framework around polymer chemistry. Nanoscale structures such as DNA origamis and denatured proteins offer a monodisperse template with pre-determined geometry and chemistry. By programming this orientation of functional group exposure on the macromolecular structure, polymerization reactions can be spatially controlled to map a designated architecture.

In addition, these hybrid structures can be made functional and responsive depending on the chemistry that is chosen for both the polymerization and synthetic motifs. We collaborate extensively to bring elucidate the influence of shape in biomedicine and physiological environments.

Selected Publications

Y. Tokura, S. Harvey, C. Chen, Y. Wu, D.Y.W. Ng, T. Weil. "Fabrication of defined polydopamine nanostructures by DNA origami-templated polymerization" Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 57, 1587-1591 (2018)

D.Y.W. Ng, R. Vill, Y. Wu, K. Koynov, Y. Tokura, W. Liu, S. Sihler, A. Kreyes, S. Ritz, H. Barth, U. Ziener, T. Weil. "Directing intracellular supramolecular assembly with N-heteroaromatic quaterthiophene analogues" Nat. Commun. 8 (1850), (2017)

C. Seidler, D.Y.W. Ng, Y. Wu, T. Weil. "pH Responsive Supramolecular Core-Shell Protein Hybrids" Supramol. Chem. 28, 742 (2016)

Click here for the complete list of publications (since 2016)


 
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