Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Soft Matter

From cell biology to polymer photovoltaics, macromolecular structures and functionalities are the result of non-equilibrium (meaning that the system is in a state that is not the global free energy minimum) processes. While very important, so far it has been challenging to characterize, manipulate and understand these non-equilibrium processes because of the lack of appropriate techniques and theoretical approaches. 

Progress in experimental and advanced computational modeling methodologies, now allows the observation of (supra-) molecular structural evolution across the wide range of length- and time scales, which is necessary to comprehend, and ultimately control and manipulate, the macroscopic (functional) properties of soft matter at the molecular level. Soft matter is particularly suited for that approach, as it is "slow" and easy to manipulate. From the experimental point of view, non-equilibrium states can be tuned through the material processing (e.g. crystallization in confined geometries, electrospinning, etc.). 

On this track at MPI-P a whole range of projects contribute to this development. Template guided synthesis on superamphiphobic surfaces, able to repel any kind of liquid, allows to create core-shell supraparticles induced by drying of a solution containing two different kinds of nanoparticles. Or a superamphiphobic substrate can be used to guide the assembly of superparamagnetic (a kind of magnetism) nanoparticles into supraparticles of different shapes that still retain their superparamagnetic properties. We also analyze the effect of equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions on formation of the ice and the implication on everyday activities such as ice skating.  Multiscale simulation methods are developed that allow studying structure formation at the interface of polymer mixtures. 

These few examples already demonstrate the wealth of challenging research opportunities the ubiquitous presence of non-equilibrium phenomena offers.

Press releases on the topic "Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Soft Matter"

Replacing the trial-and-error approach with a concept to independently tune linear and nonlinear mechanics in polymer composites – polymers with additional filler particles – scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have shown how the amount of fillers sets the strain-hardening properties. The findings allow for a tailored design of materials, for example car tires, as they need to support cyclic and static loads. more

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